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Recursive HTTP Requests with Elm


22 January 2018 elm · programming

So I got the idea in my head that I wanted to pull data from the GitLab / GitHub APIs in my Elm app. This seemed straightforward enough; just wire up an HTTP request and a JSON decoder, and off I go. Then I remember, oh crap… like any sensible API with a potentially huge amount of data behind it, the results come back paginated. For anyone unfamiliar, this means that a single API request for a list of, say, repositories, is only going to return up to some maximum number of results. If there are more results available, there will be a reference to additional pages of results, that you can then fetch with another API request. My single request decoding only the results returned from that single request wasn't going to cut it.

I had a handful of problems to solve. I needed to:

  • Detect when additional results were available.
  • Parse out the URL to use to fetch the next page of results.
  • Continue fetching results until none remained.
  • Combine all of the results, maintaining their order.

Are there more results?

The first two bullet points can be dealt with by parsing and inspecting the response header. Both GitHub and GitLab embed pagination links in the HTTP Link header. As I'm interested in consuming pages until no further results remain, I'll be looking for a link in the header with the relationship "next". If I find one, I know I need to hit the associated URL to fetch more results. If I don't find one, I'm done!

Parsing this stuff out went straight into a utility module.

module Paginated.Util exposing (links)

import Dict exposing (Dict)
import Maybe.Extra
import Regex


{-| Parse an HTTP Link header into a dictionary. For example, to look
for a link to additional results in an API response, you could do the
following:

    Dict.get "Link" response.headers
        |> Maybe.map links
        |> Maybe.andThen (Dict.get "next")

-}
links : String -> Dict String String
links s =
    let
        toTuples xs =
            case xs of
                [ Just a, Just b ] ->
                    Just ( b, a )

                _ ->
                    Nothing
    in
        Regex.find
            Regex.All
            (Regex.regex "<(.*?)>; rel=\"(.*?)\"")
            s
            |> List.map .submatches
            |> List.map toTuples
            |> Maybe.Extra.values
            |> Dict.fromList

A little bit of regular expression magic, tuples, and Maybe.Extra.values to keep the matches, and now I've got my (Maybe) URL.

Time to make some requests

Now's the time to define some types. I'll need a Request, which will be similar to a standard Http.Request, with a slight difference.

type alias RequestOptions a =
    { method : String
    , headers : List Http.Header
    , url : String
    , body : Http.Body
    , decoder : Decoder a
    , timeout : Maybe Time.Time
    , withCredentials : Bool
    }


type Request a
    = Request (RequestOptions a)

What separates it from a basic Http.Request is the decoder field instead of an expect field. The expect field in an HTTP request is responsible for parsing the full response into whatever result the caller wants. For my purposes, I always intend to be hitting a JSON API returning a list of items, and I have my own designs on parsing bits of the request to pluck out the headers. Therefore, I expose only a slot for including a JSON decoder representing the type of item I'll be getting a collection of.

I'll also need a Response, which will either be Partial (containing the results from the response, plus a Request for getting the next batch), or Complete.

type Response a
    = Partial (Request a) (List a)
    | Complete (List a)

Sending the request isn't too bad. I can just convert my request into an Http.Request, and use Http.send.

send :
    (Result Http.Error (Response a) -> msg)
    -> Request a
    -> Cmd msg
send resultToMessage request =
    Http.send resultToMessage <|
        httpRequest request


httpRequest : Request a -> Http.Request (Response a)
httpRequest (Request options) =
    Http.request
        { method = options.method
        , headers = options.headers
        , url = options.url
        , body = options.body
        , expect = expect options
        , timeout = options.timeout
        , withCredentials = options.withCredentials
        }


expect : RequestOptions a -> Http.Expect (Response a)
expect options =
    Http.expectStringResponse (fromResponse options)

All of my special logic for handling the headers, mapping the decoder over the results, and packing them up into a Response is baked into my Http.Request via a private fromResponse translator:

fromResponse :
    RequestOptions a
    -> Http.Response String
    -> Result String (Response a)
fromResponse options response =
    let
        items : Result String (List a)
        items =
            Json.Decode.decodeString
                (Json.Decode.list options.decoder)
                response.body

        nextPage =
            Dict.get "Link" response.headers
                |> Maybe.map Paginated.Util.links
                |> Maybe.andThen (Dict.get "next")
    in
        case nextPage of
            Nothing ->
                Result.map Complete items

            Just url ->
                Result.map
                    (Partial (request { options | url = url }))
                    items

Putting it together

Now, I can make my API request, and get back a response with potentially partial results. All that needs to be done now is to make my request, and iterate on the results I get back in my update method.

To make things a bit easier, I add a method for concatenating two responses:

update : Response a -> Response a -> Response a
update old new =
    case ( old, new ) of
        ( Complete items, _ ) ->
            Complete items

        ( Partial _ oldItems, Complete newItems ) ->
            Complete (oldItems ++ newItems)

        ( Partial _ oldItems, Partial request newItems ) ->
            Partial request (oldItems ++ newItems)

Putting it all together, I get a fully functional test app that fetches a paginated list of repositories from GitLab, and renders them when I've fetched them all:

module Example exposing (..)

import Html exposing (Html)
import Http
import Json.Decode exposing (field, string)
import Paginated exposing (Response(..))


type alias Model =
    { repositories : Maybe (Response String) }


type Msg
    = GotRepositories (Result Http.Error (Paginated.Response String))


main : Program Never Model Msg
main =
    Html.program
        { init = init
        , update = update
        , view = view
        , subscriptions = \_ -> Sub.none
        }


init : ( Model, Cmd Msg )
init =
    ( { repositories = Nothing }
    , getRepositories
    )


update : Msg -> Model -> ( Model, Cmd Msg )
update msg model =
    case msg of
        GotRepositories (Ok response) ->
            ( { model
                | repositories =
                    case model.repositories of
                        Nothing ->
                            Just response

                        Just previous ->
                            Just (Paginated.update previous response)
              }
            , case response of
                Partial request _ ->
                    Paginated.send GotRepositories request

                Complete _ ->
                    Cmd.none
            )

        GotRepositories (Err _) ->
            ( { model | repositories = Nothing }
            , Cmd.none
            )


view : Model -> Html Msg
view model =
    case model.repositories of
        Nothing ->
            Html.div [] [ Html.text "Loading" ]

        Just (Partial _ _) ->
            Html.div [] [ Html.text "Loading..." ]

        Just (Complete repos) ->
            Html.ul [] <|
                List.map
                    (\x -> Html.li [] [ Html.text x ])
                    repos


getRepositories : Cmd Msg
getRepositories =
    Paginated.send GotRepositories <|
        Paginated.get
            "http://git.phoenixinquis.net/api/v4/projects?per_page=5"
            (field "name" string)

There's got to be a better way

I've got it working, and it's working well. However, it's kind of a pain to use. It's nice that I can play with the results as they come in by peeking into the Partial structure, but it's a real chore to have to stitch the results together in my application's update method. It'd be nice if I could somehow encapsulate that behavior in my request and not have to worry about the pagination at all in my app.

It just so happens that, with Tasks, I can.

To be continued…

For now, feel free to check out the full library documentation and code referenced in this post here.

Use a different theme when publishing Org files


23 February 2016 emacs · org-mode · themes

I've been using material-theme lately, and I sometimes switch around, but I've found that solarized produces the best exported code block results. To avoid having to remember to switch themes when exporting, I wrote a quick wrapper for org-export to do it for me:

(defun my/with-theme (theme fn &rest args)
  (let ((current-themes custom-enabled-themes))
    (mapcar #'disable-theme custom-enabled-themes)
    (load-theme theme t)
    (let ((result (apply fn args)))
      (mapcar #'disable-theme custom-enabled-themes)
      (mapcar (lambda (theme) (load-theme theme t)) current-themes)
      result)))

(advice-add #'org-export-to-file :around (apply-partially #'my/with-theme 'solarized-dark))
(advice-add #'org-export-to-buffer :around (apply-partially #'my/with-theme 'solarized-dark))

Voilà, no more bizarrely formatted code block exports from whatever theme I might have loaded at the time :)

Drawing Git Graphs with Graphviz and Org-Mode


12 July 2015 emacs · org-mode · git · graphviz

Digging through Derek Feichtinger's org-babel examples (which I came across via irreal.org), I found he had some great examples of displaying git-style graphs using graphviz. I thought it'd be a fun exercise to generate my own graphs based on his graphviz source using elisp, and point it at actual git repos.

Getting Started

I started out with the goal of building a simple graph showing a mainline branch and a topic branch forked from it and eventually merged back in.

Using Derek's example as a template, I described 5 commits on a master branch, plus two on a topic branch.

digraph G {
        rankdir="LR";
        bgcolor="transparent";
        node[width=0.15, height=0.15, shape=point];
        edge[weight=2, arrowhead=none];
        node[group=master];
        1 -> 2 -> 3 -> 4 -> 5;
        node[group=branch];
        2 -> 6 -> 7 -> 4;
}

The resulting image looks like this:

G 1 2 1->2 3 2->3 6 2->6 4 3->4 5 4->5 7 6->7 7->4

Designing the Data Structure

The first thing I needed to do was describe my data structure. Leaning on my experiences reading and working through SICP, I got to work building a constructor function, and several accessors.

I decided to represent each node on a graph with an id, a list of parent ids, and a group which will correspond to the branch on the graph the commit belongs to.

(defun git-graph/make-node (id &optional parents group)
  (list id parents group))

(defun git-graph/node-id (node)
  (nth 0 node))

(defun git-graph/node-parents (node)
  (nth 1 node))

(defun git-graph/node-group (node)
  (nth 2 node))

Converting the structure to Graphviz

Now that I had my data structures sorted out, it was time to step through them and generate the graphviz source that'd give me the nice-looking graphs I was after.

The graph is constructed using the example above as a template. The nodes are defined first, followed by the edges between them.

(defun git-graph/to-graphviz (id nodes)
  (string-join
   (list
    (concat "digraph " id " {")
    "bgcolor=\"transparent\";"
    "rankdir=\"LR\";"
    "node[width=0.15,height=0.15,shape=point,fontsize=8.0];"
    "edge[weight=2,arrowhead=none];"
    (string-join
     (-map #'git-graph/to-graphviz-node nodes)
     "\n")
     (string-join
      (-uniq (-flatten (-map #'git-graph/to-graphviz-edges nodes)))
      "\n")
      "}")
   "\n"))

For the sake of readability, I'll format the output:

(defun git-graph/to-graphviz-pretty (id nodes)
  (with-temp-buffer
    (graphviz-dot-mode)
    (insert (git-graph/to-graphviz id nodes))
    (indent-region (point-min) (point-max))
    (buffer-string)))

Each node is built, setting its group attribute when applicable.

(defun git-graph/to-graphviz-node (node)
  (let ((node-id (git-graph/to-graphviz-node-id
                  (git-graph/node-id node))))
    (concat node-id
            (--if-let (git-graph/node-group node)
                (concat "[group=\"" it "\"]"))
            ";")))

Graphviz node identifiers are quoted to avoid running into issues with spaces or other special characters.

(defun git-graph/to-graphviz-node-id (id)
  (format "\"%s\"" id))

For each node, an edge is built connecting the node to each of its parents.

(defun git-graph/to-graphviz-edges (node)
  (let ((node-id (git-graph/node-id node))
        (parents (git-graph/node-parents node)))
    (-map (lambda (parent)
            (git-graph/to-graphviz-edge node-id parent))
          parents)))

(defun git-graph/to-graphviz-edge (from to)
  (concat
   (git-graph/to-graphviz-node-id to)
   " -> "
   (git-graph/to-graphviz-node-id from)
   ";"))

With that done, the simple graph above could be generated with the following code:

(git-graph/to-graphviz-pretty
 "example"
 (list (git-graph/make-node 1 nil "master")
       (git-graph/make-node 2 '(1) "master")
       (git-graph/make-node 3 '(2) "master")
       (git-graph/make-node 4 '(3 7) "master")
       (git-graph/make-node 5 '(4) "master")
       (git-graph/make-node 6 '(2) "branch")
       (git-graph/make-node 7 '(6) "branch")))

Which generates the following graphviz source:

digraph example {
        bgcolor="transparent";
        rankdir="LR";
        node[width=0.15,height=0.15,shape=point,fontsize=8.0];
        edge[weight=2,arrowhead=none];
        "1"[group="master"];
        "2"[group="master"];
        "3"[group="master"];
        "4"[group="master"];
        "5"[group="master"];
        "6"[group="branch"];
        "7"[group="branch"];
        "1" -> "2";
        "2" -> "3";
        "3" -> "4";
        "7" -> "4";
        "4" -> "5";
        "2" -> "6";
        "6" -> "7";
}

The generated image matches the example exactly:

example 1 2 1->2 3 2->3 6 2->6 4 3->4 5 4->5 7 6->7 7->4

Adding Labels

The next thing my graph needed was a way of labeling nodes. Rather than trying to figure out some way of attaching a separate label to a node, I decided to simply draw a labeled node as a box with text.

digraph G {
        rankdir="LR";
        bgcolor="transparent";
        node[width=0.15, height=0.15, shape=point,fontsize=8.0];
        edge[weight=2, arrowhead=none];
        node[group=main];
        1 -> 2 -> 3 -> 4 -> 5;
        5[shape=box,label=master];
        node[group=branch1];
        2 -> 6 -> 7 -> 4;
        7[shape=box,label=branch];
}
G 1 2 1->2 3 2->3 6 2->6 4 3->4 5 master 4->5 7 branch 6->7 7->4

Updating the Data Structure

I updated my data structure to support an optional label applied to a node. I opted to store it in an associative list alongside the group.

(defun git-graph/make-node (id &optional parents options)
  (list id parents options))

(defun git-graph/node-id (node)
  (nth 0 node))

(defun git-graph/node-parents (node)
  (nth 1 node))

(defun git-graph/node-group (node)
  (cdr (assoc 'group (nth 2 node))))

(defun git-graph/node-label (node)
  (cdr (assoc 'label (nth 2 node))))

Updating the Graphviz node generation

The next step was updating the Graphviz generation functions to handle the new data structure, and set the shape and label attributes of labeled nodes.

(defun git-graph/to-graphviz-node (node)
  (let ((node-id (git-graph/to-graphviz-node-id (git-graph/node-id node))))
    (concat node-id
            (git-graph/to-graphviz-node--attributes node)
            ";")))

(defun git-graph/to-graphviz-node--attributes (node)
  (let ((attributes (git-graph/to-graphviz-node--compute-attributes node)))
    (and attributes
         (concat "["
                 (mapconcat (lambda (pair)
                              (format "%s=\"%s\""
                                      (car pair) (cdr pair)))
                            attributes
                            ", ")
                 "]"))))

(defun git-graph/to-graphviz-node--compute-attributes (node)
  (-filter #'identity
           (append (and (git-graph/node-group node)
                        (list (cons 'group (git-graph/node-group node))))
                   (and (git-graph/node-label node)
                        (list (cons 'shape 'box)
                              (cons 'label (git-graph/node-label node)))))))

I could then label the tips of each branch:

(git-graph/to-graphviz-pretty
 "labeled"
 (list (git-graph/make-node 1 nil '((group . "master")))
       (git-graph/make-node 2 '(1) '((group . "master")))
       (git-graph/make-node 3 '(2) '((group . "master")))
       (git-graph/make-node 4 '(3 7) '((group . "master")))
       (git-graph/make-node 5 '(4) '((group . "master")
                                     (label . "master")))
       (git-graph/make-node 6 '(2) '((group . "branch")))
       (git-graph/make-node 7 '(6) '((group . "branch")
                                     (label . "branch")))))
digraph labeled {
        bgcolor="transparent";
        rankdir="LR";
        node[width=0.15,height=0.15,shape=point,fontsize=8.0];
        edge[weight=2,arrowhead=none];
        "1"[group="master"];
        "2"[group="master"];
        "3"[group="master"];
        "4"[group="master"];
        "5"[group="master", shape="box", label="master"];
        "6"[group="branch"];
        "7"[group="branch", shape="box", label="branch"];
        "1" -> "2";
        "2" -> "3";
        "3" -> "4";
        "7" -> "4";
        "4" -> "5";
        "2" -> "6";
        "6" -> "7";
}
labeled 1 2 1->2 3 2->3 6 2->6 4 3->4 5 master 4->5 7 branch 6->7 7->4

Automatic Grouping Using Leaf Nodes

Manually assigning groups to each node is tedious, and easy to accidentally get wrong. Also, with the goal to graph git repositories, I was going to have to figure out groupings automatically anyway.

To do this, it made sense to traverse the nodes in topological order.

Repeating the example above,

digraph G {
        rankdir="LR";
        bgcolor="transparent";
        node[width=0.15, height=0.15, shape=circle];
        edge[weight=2, arrowhead=none];
        node[group=main];
        1 -> 2 -> 3 -> 4 -> 5;
        node[group=branch1];
        2 -> 6 -> 7 -> 4;
}
G 1 1 2 2 1->2 3 3 2->3 6 6 2->6 4 4 3->4 5 5 4->5 7 7 6->7 7->4

These nodes can be represented (right to left) in topological order as either 5, 4, 3, 7, 6, 2, 1 or 5, 4, 7, 6, 3, 2, 1.

Having no further children, 5 is a leaf node, and can be used as a group. All first parents of 5 can therefore be considered to be in group 5.

7 is a second parent to 4, and so should be used as the group for all of its parents not present in group 5.

(defun git-graph/group-topo (nodelist)
  (reverse
   (car
    (-reduce-from
     (lambda (acc node)
       (let* ((grouped-nodes (car acc))
              (group-stack (cdr acc))
              (node-id (git-graph/node-id node))
              (group-from-stack (--if-let (assoc node-id group-stack)
                                    (cdr it)))
              (group (or group-from-stack node-id))
              (parents (git-graph/node-parents node))
              (first-parent (first parents)))
         (if group-from-stack
             (pop group-stack))
         (if (and first-parent (not (assoc first-parent group-stack)))
             (push (cons first-parent group) group-stack))
         (cons (cons (git-graph/make-node node-id
                                    parents
                                    `((group . ,group)
                                      (label . ,(git-graph/node-label node))))
                     grouped-nodes)
               group-stack)))
     nil
     nodelist))))

While iterating through the node list, I maintained a stack of pairs built from the first parent of the current node, and the current group. To determine the group, the head of the stack is checked to see if it contains a group for the current node id. If it does, that group is used and it is popped off the stack, otherwise the current node id is used.

The following table illustrates how the stack is used to store and assign group relationships as the process iterates through the node list:

Table 1: Progressing through the nodes
Node Parents Group Stack Group
5 (4) (4 . 5) 5
4 (3 7) (3 . 5) 5
3 (2) (2 . 5) 5
7 (6) (6 . 7) (2 . 5) 7
6 (2) (2 . 5) 7
2 (1) (1 . 5) 5
1     5

Graph without automatic grouping

(git-graph/to-graphviz-pretty
 "nogroups"
 (list (git-graph/make-node 5 '(4) '((label . master)))
       (git-graph/make-node 4 '(3 7))
       (git-graph/make-node 3 '(2))
       (git-graph/make-node 7 '(6) '((label . develop)))
       (git-graph/make-node 6 '(2))
       (git-graph/make-node 2 '(1))
       (git-graph/make-node 1 nil)))
digraph nogroups {
        bgcolor="transparent";
        rankdir="LR";
        node[width=0.15,height=0.15,shape=point,fontsize=8.0];
        edge[weight=2,arrowhead=none];
        "5"[shape="box", label="master"];
        "4";
        "3";
        "7"[shape="box", label="develop"];
        "6";
        "2";
        "1";
        "4" -> "5";
        "3" -> "4";
        "7" -> "4";
        "2" -> "3";
        "6" -> "7";
        "2" -> "6";
        "1" -> "2";
}
nogroups 5 master 4 4->5 3 3->4 7 develop 7->4 6 6->7 2 2->3 2->6 1 1->2

Graph with automatic grouping

(git-graph/to-graphviz-pretty
 "autogroups"
 (git-graph/group-topo
  (list (git-graph/make-node 5 '(4) '((label . master)))
        (git-graph/make-node 4 '(3 7))
        (git-graph/make-node 3 '(2))
        (git-graph/make-node 7 '(6) '((label . develop)))
        (git-graph/make-node 6 '(2))
        (git-graph/make-node 2 '(1))
        (git-graph/make-node 1 nil))))
digraph autogroups {
        bgcolor="transparent";
        rankdir="LR";
        node[width=0.15,height=0.15,shape=point,fontsize=8.0];
        edge[weight=2,arrowhead=none];
        "5"[group="5", shape="box", label="master"];
        "4"[group="5"];
        "3"[group="5"];
        "7"[group="7", shape="box", label="develop"];
        "6"[group="7"];
        "2"[group="5"];
        "1"[group="5"];
        "4" -> "5";
        "3" -> "4";
        "7" -> "4";
        "2" -> "3";
        "6" -> "7";
        "2" -> "6";
        "1" -> "2";
}
autogroups 5 master 4 4->5 3 3->4 7 develop 7->4 6 6->7 2 2->3 2->6 1 1->2

Graphing a Git Repository

Satisfied that I had all the necessary tools to start graphing real git repositories, I created an example repository to test against.

Creating a Sample Repository

Using the following script, I created a sample repository to test against. I performed the following actions:

  • Forked a develop branch from master.
  • Forked a feature branch from develop, with two commits.
  • Added another commit to develop.
  • Forked a second feature branch from develop, with two commits.
  • Merged the second feature branch to develop.
  • Merged develop to master and tagged it.
mkdir /tmp/test.git
cd /tmp/test.git
git init
touch README
git add README
git commit -m 'initial'
git commit --allow-empty -m 'first'
git checkout -b develop
git commit --allow-empty -m 'second'
git checkout -b feature-1
git commit --allow-empty -m 'feature 1'
git commit --allow-empty -m 'feature 1 again'
git checkout develop
git commit --allow-empty -m 'third'
git checkout -b feature-2
git commit --allow-empty -m 'feature 2'
git commit --allow-empty -m 'feature 2 again'
git checkout develop
git merge --no-ff feature-2
git checkout master
git merge --no-ff develop
git tag -a 1.0 -m '1.0!'

Generating a Graph From a Git Branch

The first order of business was to have a way to call out to git and return the results:

(defun git-graph/git-execute (repo-url command &rest args)
  (with-temp-buffer
    (shell-command (format "git -C \"%s\" %s"
                           repo-url
                           (string-join (cons command args)
                                        " "))
                   t)
    (buffer-string)))

Next, I needed to get the list of commits for a branch in topological order, with a list of parent commits for each. It turns out git provides exactly that via its rev-list command.

(defun git-graph/git-rev-list (repo-url head)
  (-map (lambda (line) (split-string line))
        (split-string (git-graph/git-execute
                       repo-url
                       "rev-list" "--topo-order" "--parents" head)
                      "\n" t)))

I also wanted to label branch heads wherever possible. To do this, I looked up the revision name from git, discarding it if it was relative to some other named commit.

(defun git-graph/git-label (repo-url rev)
  (let ((name (string-trim
               (git-graph/git-execute repo-url
                                      "name-rev" "--name-only" rev))))
    (unless (s-contains? "~" name)
      name)))

Generating the graph for a single branch was as simple as iterating over each commit and creating a node for it.

(defun git-graph/git-graph-head (repo-url head)
  (git-graph/group-topo
   (-map (lambda (rev-with-parents)
           (let* ((rev (car rev-with-parents))
                  (parents (cdr rev-with-parents))
                  (label (git-graph/git-label repo-url rev)))
             (git-graph/make-node rev parents
                                  `((label . ,label)))))
         (git-graph/git-rev-list repo-url head))))

Here's the result of graphing the master branch:

(git-graph/to-graphviz-pretty
 "git"
 (git-graph/git-graph-head
  "/tmp/test.git"
  "master"))
digraph git {
        bgcolor="transparent";
        rankdir="LR";
        node[width=0.15,height=0.15,shape=point,fontsize=8.0];
        edge[weight=2,arrowhead=none];
        "b705cc1cf18544636e46164174e60645c94f3c28"[group="b705cc1cf18544636e46164174e60645c94f3c28", shape="box", label="master"];
        "c417706bcf893d6c97edfd4557bd9aa380ac79aa"[group="c417706bcf893d6c97edfd4557bd9aa380ac79aa", shape="box", label="develop"];
        "2cfd88c610e0d4fd3be5bcbf4c3586e39256c3d0"[group="2cfd88c610e0d4fd3be5bcbf4c3586e39256c3d0", shape="box", label="feature-2"];
        "e84b9e97fe99f7c9edddf726c531192288868ded"[group="2cfd88c610e0d4fd3be5bcbf4c3586e39256c3d0"];
        "bd5ca4b50b8b7139ef56298b9d1b73a0e0c16be6"[group="c417706bcf893d6c97edfd4557bd9aa380ac79aa"];
        "16f6f06916f130bf2fd8c2cd6676c237d8b86e68"[group="c417706bcf893d6c97edfd4557bd9aa380ac79aa"];
        "813c0cce8970964c4f30c1c755a494137f16f120"[group="b705cc1cf18544636e46164174e60645c94f3c28"];
        "02d0748a87816cd252097bb53b7d090db5d177e9"[group="b705cc1cf18544636e46164174e60645c94f3c28"];
        "813c0cce8970964c4f30c1c755a494137f16f120" -> "b705cc1cf18544636e46164174e60645c94f3c28";
        "c417706bcf893d6c97edfd4557bd9aa380ac79aa" -> "b705cc1cf18544636e46164174e60645c94f3c28";
        "bd5ca4b50b8b7139ef56298b9d1b73a0e0c16be6" -> "c417706bcf893d6c97edfd4557bd9aa380ac79aa";
        "2cfd88c610e0d4fd3be5bcbf4c3586e39256c3d0" -> "c417706bcf893d6c97edfd4557bd9aa380ac79aa";
        "e84b9e97fe99f7c9edddf726c531192288868ded" -> "2cfd88c610e0d4fd3be5bcbf4c3586e39256c3d0";
        "bd5ca4b50b8b7139ef56298b9d1b73a0e0c16be6" -> "e84b9e97fe99f7c9edddf726c531192288868ded";
        "16f6f06916f130bf2fd8c2cd6676c237d8b86e68" -> "bd5ca4b50b8b7139ef56298b9d1b73a0e0c16be6";
        "813c0cce8970964c4f30c1c755a494137f16f120" -> "16f6f06916f130bf2fd8c2cd6676c237d8b86e68";
        "02d0748a87816cd252097bb53b7d090db5d177e9" -> "813c0cce8970964c4f30c1c755a494137f16f120";
}
git b705cc1cf18544636e46164174e60645c94f3c28 master c417706bcf893d6c97edfd4557bd9aa380ac79aa develop c417706bcf893d6c97edfd4557bd9aa380ac79aa->b705cc1cf18544636e46164174e60645c94f3c28 2cfd88c610e0d4fd3be5bcbf4c3586e39256c3d0 feature-2 2cfd88c610e0d4fd3be5bcbf4c3586e39256c3d0->c417706bcf893d6c97edfd4557bd9aa380ac79aa e84b9e97fe99f7c9edddf726c531192288868ded e84b9e97fe99f7c9edddf726c531192288868ded->2cfd88c610e0d4fd3be5bcbf4c3586e39256c3d0 bd5ca4b50b8b7139ef56298b9d1b73a0e0c16be6 bd5ca4b50b8b7139ef56298b9d1b73a0e0c16be6->c417706bcf893d6c97edfd4557bd9aa380ac79aa bd5ca4b50b8b7139ef56298b9d1b73a0e0c16be6->e84b9e97fe99f7c9edddf726c531192288868ded 16f6f06916f130bf2fd8c2cd6676c237d8b86e68 16f6f06916f130bf2fd8c2cd6676c237d8b86e68->bd5ca4b50b8b7139ef56298b9d1b73a0e0c16be6 813c0cce8970964c4f30c1c755a494137f16f120 813c0cce8970964c4f30c1c755a494137f16f120->b705cc1cf18544636e46164174e60645c94f3c28 813c0cce8970964c4f30c1c755a494137f16f120->16f6f06916f130bf2fd8c2cd6676c237d8b86e68 02d0748a87816cd252097bb53b7d090db5d177e9 02d0748a87816cd252097bb53b7d090db5d177e9->813c0cce8970964c4f30c1c755a494137f16f120

Graphing Multiple Branches

To graph multiple branches, I needed a function for combining histories. To do so, I simply append any nodes I don't already know about in the first history from the second.

(defun git-graph/+ (a b)
  (append a
          (-remove (lambda (node)
                     (assoc (git-graph/node-id node) a))
                   b)))

From there, all that remained was to accumulate the branch histories and output the complete graph:

(defun git-graph/git-load (repo-url heads)
  (-reduce #'git-graph/+
           (-map (lambda (head)
                   (git-graph/git-graph-head repo-url head))
                 heads)))

And here's the example repository, graphed in full:

(git-graph/to-graphviz-pretty
 "git"
 (git-graph/git-load
  "/tmp/test.git"
  '("master" "feature-1")))
digraph git {
        bgcolor="transparent";
        rankdir="LR";
        node[width=0.15,height=0.15,shape=point,fontsize=8.0];
        edge[weight=2,arrowhead=none];
        "b705cc1cf18544636e46164174e60645c94f3c28"[group="b705cc1cf18544636e46164174e60645c94f3c28", shape="box", label="master"];
        "c417706bcf893d6c97edfd4557bd9aa380ac79aa"[group="c417706bcf893d6c97edfd4557bd9aa380ac79aa", shape="box", label="develop"];
        "2cfd88c610e0d4fd3be5bcbf4c3586e39256c3d0"[group="2cfd88c610e0d4fd3be5bcbf4c3586e39256c3d0", shape="box", label="feature-2"];
        "e84b9e97fe99f7c9edddf726c531192288868ded"[group="2cfd88c610e0d4fd3be5bcbf4c3586e39256c3d0"];
        "bd5ca4b50b8b7139ef56298b9d1b73a0e0c16be6"[group="c417706bcf893d6c97edfd4557bd9aa380ac79aa"];
        "16f6f06916f130bf2fd8c2cd6676c237d8b86e68"[group="c417706bcf893d6c97edfd4557bd9aa380ac79aa"];
        "813c0cce8970964c4f30c1c755a494137f16f120"[group="b705cc1cf18544636e46164174e60645c94f3c28"];
        "02d0748a87816cd252097bb53b7d090db5d177e9"[group="b705cc1cf18544636e46164174e60645c94f3c28"];
        "2c3627a9512bafa4b67f36fa9284cc8857b41e57"[group="2c3627a9512bafa4b67f36fa9284cc8857b41e57", shape="box", label="feature-1"];
        "b3b234b4b4396e21c027ea40eef997ed9f38d045"[group="2c3627a9512bafa4b67f36fa9284cc8857b41e57"];
        "813c0cce8970964c4f30c1c755a494137f16f120" -> "b705cc1cf18544636e46164174e60645c94f3c28";
        "c417706bcf893d6c97edfd4557bd9aa380ac79aa" -> "b705cc1cf18544636e46164174e60645c94f3c28";
        "bd5ca4b50b8b7139ef56298b9d1b73a0e0c16be6" -> "c417706bcf893d6c97edfd4557bd9aa380ac79aa";
        "2cfd88c610e0d4fd3be5bcbf4c3586e39256c3d0" -> "c417706bcf893d6c97edfd4557bd9aa380ac79aa";
        "e84b9e97fe99f7c9edddf726c531192288868ded" -> "2cfd88c610e0d4fd3be5bcbf4c3586e39256c3d0";
        "bd5ca4b50b8b7139ef56298b9d1b73a0e0c16be6" -> "e84b9e97fe99f7c9edddf726c531192288868ded";
        "16f6f06916f130bf2fd8c2cd6676c237d8b86e68" -> "bd5ca4b50b8b7139ef56298b9d1b73a0e0c16be6";
        "813c0cce8970964c4f30c1c755a494137f16f120" -> "16f6f06916f130bf2fd8c2cd6676c237d8b86e68";
        "02d0748a87816cd252097bb53b7d090db5d177e9" -> "813c0cce8970964c4f30c1c755a494137f16f120";
        "b3b234b4b4396e21c027ea40eef997ed9f38d045" -> "2c3627a9512bafa4b67f36fa9284cc8857b41e57";
        "16f6f06916f130bf2fd8c2cd6676c237d8b86e68" -> "b3b234b4b4396e21c027ea40eef997ed9f38d045";
}
git b705cc1cf18544636e46164174e60645c94f3c28 master c417706bcf893d6c97edfd4557bd9aa380ac79aa develop c417706bcf893d6c97edfd4557bd9aa380ac79aa->b705cc1cf18544636e46164174e60645c94f3c28 2cfd88c610e0d4fd3be5bcbf4c3586e39256c3d0 feature-2 2cfd88c610e0d4fd3be5bcbf4c3586e39256c3d0->c417706bcf893d6c97edfd4557bd9aa380ac79aa e84b9e97fe99f7c9edddf726c531192288868ded e84b9e97fe99f7c9edddf726c531192288868ded->2cfd88c610e0d4fd3be5bcbf4c3586e39256c3d0 bd5ca4b50b8b7139ef56298b9d1b73a0e0c16be6 bd5ca4b50b8b7139ef56298b9d1b73a0e0c16be6->c417706bcf893d6c97edfd4557bd9aa380ac79aa bd5ca4b50b8b7139ef56298b9d1b73a0e0c16be6->e84b9e97fe99f7c9edddf726c531192288868ded 16f6f06916f130bf2fd8c2cd6676c237d8b86e68 16f6f06916f130bf2fd8c2cd6676c237d8b86e68->bd5ca4b50b8b7139ef56298b9d1b73a0e0c16be6 b3b234b4b4396e21c027ea40eef997ed9f38d045 16f6f06916f130bf2fd8c2cd6676c237d8b86e68->b3b234b4b4396e21c027ea40eef997ed9f38d045 813c0cce8970964c4f30c1c755a494137f16f120 813c0cce8970964c4f30c1c755a494137f16f120->b705cc1cf18544636e46164174e60645c94f3c28 813c0cce8970964c4f30c1c755a494137f16f120->16f6f06916f130bf2fd8c2cd6676c237d8b86e68 02d0748a87816cd252097bb53b7d090db5d177e9 02d0748a87816cd252097bb53b7d090db5d177e9->813c0cce8970964c4f30c1c755a494137f16f120 2c3627a9512bafa4b67f36fa9284cc8857b41e57 feature-1 b3b234b4b4396e21c027ea40eef997ed9f38d045->2c3627a9512bafa4b67f36fa9284cc8857b41e57

Things I may add in the future

Limiting Commits to Graph

Running this against repos with any substantial history can make the graph unwieldy. It'd be a good idea to abstract out the commit list fetching, and modify it to support different ways of limiting the history to display.

Ideas would include:

  • Specifying commit ranges
  • Stopping at a common ancestor to all graphed branches (e.g., using git-merge-base).
  • Other git commit limiting options, like searches, showing only merge or non-merge commits, etc.

Collapsing History

Another means of reducing the size of the resulting graph would be to collapse unimportant sections of it. It should be possible to collapse a section of the graph, showing a count of skipped nodes.

The difficult part would be determining what parts aren't worth drawing. Something like this would be handy, though, for concisely graphing the state of multiple ongoing development branches (say, to get a picture of what's been going on since the last release, and what's still incomplete).

digraph G {
        rankdir="LR";
        bgcolor="transparent";
        node[width=0.15,height=0.15,shape=point];
        edge[weight=2,arrowhead=none];
        node[group=main];
        1 -> 2 -> 3 -> 4 -> 5;
        node[group=branch];
        2 -> 6 -> 7 -> 8 -> 9 -> 10 -> 4;
}
G 1 2 1->2 3 2->3 6 2->6 4 3->4 5 4->5 7 6->7 8 7->8 9 8->9 10 9->10 10->4
digraph G {
        rankdir="LR";
        bgcolor="transparent";
        node[width=0.15,height=0.15,shape=point];
        edge[weight=2,arrowhead=none];
        node[group=main];
        1 -> 2 -> 3 -> 4 -> 5;
        node[group=branch];
        2 -> 6;
        6 -> 10[style=dashed,label="+3"];
        10 -> 4;
}
G 1 2 1->2 3 2->3 6 2->6 4 3->4 5 4->5 10 6->10 +3 10->4

Clean up and optimize the code a bit

Some parts of this (particularly, the grouping) are probably pretty inefficient. If this turns out to actually be useful, I may take another crack at it.

Final Code

In case anyone would like to use this code for anything, or maybe just pick it apart and play around with it, all the Emacs Lisp code in this post is collected into a single file below:

;;; git-graph.el --- Generate git-style graphs using graphviz

;; Copyright (c) 2015 Correl Roush <correl@gmail.com>

;;; License:

;; This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify
;; it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by
;; the Free Software Foundation; either version 3, or (at your option)
;; any later version.
;;
;; This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
;; but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
;; MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the
;; GNU General Public License for more details.
;;
;; You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
;; along with GNU Emacs; see the file COPYING.  If not, write to the
;; Free Software Foundation, Inc., 51 Franklin Street, Fifth Floor,
;; Boston, MA 02110-1301, USA.

;;; Commentary:

;;; Code:

(require 'dash)

(defun git-graph/make-node (id &optional parents options)
  (list id parents options))

(defun git-graph/node-id (node)
  (nth 0 node))

(defun git-graph/node-parents (node)
  (nth 1 node))

(defun git-graph/node-group (node)
  (cdr (assoc 'group (nth 2 node))))

(defun git-graph/node-label (node)
  (cdr (assoc 'label (nth 2 node))))

(defun git-graph/+ (a b)
  (append a
          (-remove (lambda (node)
                     (assoc (git-graph/node-id node) a))
                   b)))

(defun git-graph/to-graphviz (id nodes)
  (string-join
   (list
    (concat "digraph " id " {")
    "bgcolor=\"transparent\";"
    "rankdir=\"LR\";"
    "node[width=0.15,height=0.15,shape=point,fontsize=8.0];"
    "edge[weight=2,arrowhead=none];"
    (string-join
     (-map #'git-graph/to-graphviz-node nodes)
     "\n")
     (string-join
      (-uniq (-flatten (-map #'git-graph/to-graphviz-edges nodes)))
      "\n")
      "}")
   "\n"))
(defun git-graph/to-graphviz-pretty (id nodes)
  (with-temp-buffer
    (graphviz-dot-mode)
    (insert (git-graph/to-graphviz id nodes))
    (indent-region (point-min) (point-max))
    (buffer-string)))

(defun git-graph/to-graphviz-node-id (id)
  (format "\"%s\"" id))
(defun git-graph/to-graphviz-node (node)
  (let ((node-id (git-graph/to-graphviz-node-id (git-graph/node-id node))))
    (concat node-id
            (git-graph/to-graphviz-node--attributes node)
            ";")))

(defun git-graph/to-graphviz-node--attributes (node)
  (let ((attributes (git-graph/to-graphviz-node--compute-attributes node)))
    (and attributes
         (concat "["
                 (mapconcat (lambda (pair)
                              (format "%s=\"%s\""
                                      (car pair) (cdr pair)))
                            attributes
                            ", ")
                 "]"))))

(defun git-graph/to-graphviz-node--compute-attributes (node)
  (-filter #'identity
           (append (and (git-graph/node-group node)
                        (list (cons 'group (git-graph/node-group node))))
                   (and (git-graph/node-label node)
                        (list (cons 'shape 'box)
                              (cons 'label (git-graph/node-label node)))))))

(defun git-graph/to-graphviz-edges (node)
  (let ((node-id (git-graph/node-id node))
        (parents (git-graph/node-parents node)))
    (-map (lambda (parent)
            (git-graph/to-graphviz-edge node-id parent))
          parents)))

(defun git-graph/to-graphviz-edge (from to)
  (concat
   (git-graph/to-graphviz-node-id to)
   " -> "
   (git-graph/to-graphviz-node-id from)
   ";"))

(defun git-graph/group-topo (nodelist)
  (reverse
   (car
    (-reduce-from
     (lambda (acc node)
       (let* ((grouped-nodes (car acc))
              (group-stack (cdr acc))
              (node-id (git-graph/node-id node))
              (group-from-stack (--if-let (assoc node-id group-stack)
                                    (cdr it)))
              (group (or group-from-stack node-id))
              (parents (git-graph/node-parents node))
              (first-parent (first parents)))
         (if group-from-stack
             (pop group-stack))
         (if (and first-parent (not (assoc first-parent group-stack)))
             (push (cons first-parent group) group-stack))
         (cons (cons (git-graph/make-node node-id
                                    parents
                                    `((group . ,group)
                                      (label . ,(git-graph/node-label node))))
                     grouped-nodes)
               group-stack)))
     nil
     nodelist))))

(defun git-graph/git-execute (repo-url command &rest args)
  (with-temp-buffer
    (shell-command (format "git -C \"%s\" %s"
                           repo-url
                           (string-join (cons command args)
                                        " "))
                   t)
    (buffer-string)))
(defun git-graph/git-rev-list (repo-url head)
  (-map (lambda (line) (split-string line))
        (split-string (git-graph/git-execute
                       repo-url
                       "rev-list" "--topo-order" "--parents" head)
                      "\n" t)))
(defun git-graph/git-label (repo-url rev)
  (let ((name (string-trim
               (git-graph/git-execute repo-url
                                      "name-rev" "--name-only" rev))))
    (unless (s-contains? "~" name)
      name)))
(defun git-graph/git-graph-head (repo-url head)
  (git-graph/group-topo
   (-map (lambda (rev-with-parents)
           (let* ((rev (car rev-with-parents))
                  (parents (cdr rev-with-parents))
                  (label (git-graph/git-label repo-url rev)))
             (git-graph/make-node rev parents
                                  `((label . ,label)))))
         (git-graph/git-rev-list repo-url head))))
(defun git-graph/git-load (repo-url heads)
  (-reduce #'git-graph/+
           (-map (lambda (head)
                   (git-graph/git-graph-head repo-url head))
                 heads)))

(provide 'git-graph)
;;; git-graph.el ends here

Download: git-graph.el

Keeping Files And Configuration In Sync


20 April 2015

I have a few computers I use on a daily basis, and I like to keep the same emacs and shell configuration on all of them, along with my org files and a handful of scripts. Since I'm sure other people have this problem as well, I'll share what I'm doing so anyone can learn from (or criticise) my solutions.

Git for configuration and projects

I'm a software developer, so keeping things in git just makes sense to me. I keep my org files in a privately hosted git repository, and Emacs and Zsh configurations in a public repo on github. My blog is also hosted and published on github as well; I like having it cloned to all my machines so I can work on drafts wherever I may be.

My .zshrc installs oh-my-zsh if it isn't installed already, and sets up my shell theme, path, and some other environmental things.

My Emacs configuration behaves similarly, making use of John Wiegley's excellent use-package tool to ensure all my packages are installed if they're not already there and configured the way I like them.

All I have to do to get running on a new system is to install git, emacs and zsh, clone my repo, symlink the files, and grab a cup of tea while everything installs.

Bittorrent sync for personal settings & books

For personal configuration that doesn't belong in and/or is too sensitive to be in a public repo, I have a folder of dotfiles and things that I sync between my machines using Bittorrent Sync. The dotfiles are arranged into directories by their purpose:

[correlr@reason:~/dotenv]
% tree -a -L 2
.
├── authinfo
│   └── .authinfo.gpg
├── bin
│   └── .bin
├── emacs
│   ├── .bbdb
│   └── .emacs.local.d
├── mail
│   ├── .gnus.el
│   ├── .signature
├── README.org
├── .sync
│   ├── Archive
│   ├── ID
│   ├── IgnoreList
│   └── StreamsList
├── tex
│   └── texmf
├── xmonad
│   └── .xmonad
└── zsh
    └── .zshenv

This folder structure allows my configs to be easily installed using GNU Stow from my dotenv folder:

stow -vvS *

Running that command will, for each file in each of the directories, create a symlink to it in my home folder if there isn't a file or directory with that name there already.

Bittorrent sync also comes in handy for syncing my growing Calibre ebook collection, which outgrew my Dropbox account a while back.

Birthday Puzzle


18 April 2015

This logic puzzle has been floating around the internet lately. When I caught wind of it, I thought it would be a great exercise to tackle using Prolog. I'm not especially good with the language yet, so it added to the challenge a bit, but it was a pretty worthwhile undertaking. When I got stumped, I discovered that mapping out the birthdays into a grid helped me visualize the problem and ultimately solve it, so I've included that with my prolog code so you can see how I arrived at the answer.

The Puzzle

Albert and Bernard have just met Cheryl. “When is your birthday?” Albert asked Cheryl. Cheryl thought for a moment and said, “I won’t tell you, but I’ll give you some clues”. She wrote down a list of ten dates:

  • May 15, May 16, May 19
  • June 17, June 18
  • July 14, July 16
  • August 14, August 15, August 17

“One of these is my birthday,” she said.

Cheryl whispered in Albert’s ear the month, and only the month, of her birthday. To Bernard, she whispered the day, and only the day. “Can you figure it out now?” she asked Albert.

Albert: “I don’t know when your birthday is, but I know Bernard doesn’t know, either.”

Bernard: “I didn’t know originally, but now I do.”

Albert: “Well, now I know, too!”

When is Cheryl’s birthday?

The Solution

The Dates

To start off, i entered each of the possible birthdays as facts:

possible_birthday(may, 15).
possible_birthday(may, 16).
possible_birthday(may, 19).
possible_birthday(june, 17).
possible_birthday(june, 18).
possible_birthday(july, 14).
possible_birthday(july, 16).
possible_birthday(august, 14).
possible_birthday(august, 15).
possible_birthday(august, 17).

And here they are, mapped out in a grid:

  May June July August
14     X X
15 X     X
16 X   X  
17   X   X
18   X    
19 X      

Albert's Statement

I don’t know when your birthday is,…

Albert only knows the month, and the month isn't enough to uniquely identify Cheryl's birthday.

month_is_not_unique(M) :-
    bagof(D, possible_birthday(M, D), Days),
    length(Days, Len),
    Len > 1.

… but I know Bernard doesn’t know, either.

Albert knows that Bernard doesn't know Cheryl's birthday. Therefore, the day alone isn't enough to know Cheryl's birthday, and we can infer that the month of Cheryl's birthday does not include any of the unique dates.

day_is_not_unique(D) :-
    bagof(M, possible_birthday(M, D), Months),
    length(Months, Len),
    Len > 1.

month_has_no_unique_days(M) :-
    forall(possible_birthday(M,D),
           day_is_not_unique(D)).

Based on what Albert knows at this point, let's see how we've reduced the possible dates:

part_one(M,D) :-
    possible_birthday(M,D),
    month_is_not_unique(M),
    month_has_no_unique_days(M),
    day_is_not_unique(D).
Results = [ (july, 14), (july, 16), (august, 14), (august, 15), (august, 17)].

So the unique days (the 18th and 19th) are out, as are the months that contained them (May and June).

  July August
14 X X
15   X
16 X  
17   X

Bernard's Statement

I didn’t know originally, but now I do.

For Bernard to know Cheryl's birthday, the day he knows must be unique within the constraints we have so far.

day_is_unique(Month, Day) :-
    findall(M, part_one(M, Day), [Month]).
part_two(Month, Day) :-
    possible_birthday(Month, Day),
    day_is_unique(Month, Day).
Results = [ (july, 16), (august, 15), (august, 17)].

Both July and August contain the 14th, so that row is out.

  July August
15   X
16 X  
17   X

Albert's Second Statement

Well, now I know, too!

Albert's month must be the remaining unique month:

month_is_not_unique(Month, Day) :-
    findall(D, part_two(Month, D), [Day]).
part_three(Month, Day) :-
    possible_birthday(Month, Day),
    month_is_not_unique(Month, Day).
Results = [ (july, 16)].

August had two possible days, so it's now clear that the only possible unique answer is July 16th.

  July
15  
16 X
17  

Cheryl's Birthday

cheryls_birthday(Month, Day) :-
    part_three(Month, Day).
Month = july,
Day = 16.

So, there we have it. Cheryl's birthday is July 16th!

  July
16 X